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AlertBoot offers a cloud-based full disk encryption and mobile device security service for companies of any size who want a scalable and easy-to-deploy solution. Centrally managed through a web based console, AlertBoot offers mobile device management, mobile antivirus, remote wipe & lock, device auditing, USB drive and hard disk encryption managed services.

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AlertBoot offers a cloud-based full disk encryption and mobile device security service for companies of any size who want a scalable and easy-to-deploy solution. Centrally managed through a web based console, AlertBoot offers mobile device management, mobile antivirus, remote wipe & lock, device auditing, USB drive and hard disk encryption managed services.

File Encryption Woes At Wiltshire County Council

It was only yesterday that I had noted, and congratulated, the Wiltshire County Council in the UK for a job well done.  They had used data encryption to secure the contents of a USB memory stick that ended up missing.  Now it looks like my congratulations may have been a little premature.

According to this article, Wiltshire County Council is embroiled in another data breach--the bad kind, where sensitive data actually has the potential to fall into abuse.

Information on approximately 150 children with special educational needs was uploaded to the district council's website, in the form of an Excel spreadsheet file.  Information include name, dates of birth, schools, and codes used in identifying the children's conditions.

Information security breaches tend to happen--it's a matter of when, not if.  And, when you consider how many breaches there are across the world, I guess you could have two breaches in less than two weeks.  I mean, the odds are low, not impossible.

However, as the article also points out, "officials thought the information had been removed after the mistake first came to light in 2004."

In other words, this is the second time this has happened.  When the same exact breach happens a second time around, chances are it's not random.  Granted, it's five years after the first...

On the one hand, maybe it means that it is a coincidence--the longer the interval between two identical breaches, the greater the chances of them being unrelated (in other words, stuff happens).

On the other hand, five years is more than enough time to implement a solution that would ensure the mistake doesn't reoccur.  For example, they could have used file encryption solutions like AlertBoot on that spreadsheet.  In fact, I was under the impression that sensitive files were routinely encrypted and password-protected, per yesterday's article.

What the heck happened, Wiltshire County Council?  I guess time will tell whether things change for the better...

 
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About sang_lee

Sang Lee is a Senior Account Manager and Security Analyst with AlertBoot, Inc., the leading provider of managed endpoint security services, based in Las Vegas, NV. Mr. Lee helps with the deployment and ongoing support of the AlertBoot disk encryption managed service. Prior to working at AlertBoot, Mr. Lee served in the South Korean Navy. He holds both a B.S. and an M.S. from Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts, U.S.A.